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Showing 1-30 of 622 items
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  • Randomized Trial of Crenolanib in Subjects With D842V Mutated GIST
  • This is a multicenter, randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, trial of oral crenolanib versus oral placebo in combination with best supportive care in subjects with advanced or metastatic GIST with a D842V mutation in the PDGFRA gene. Approximately 120 subjects will be randomized in a 2:1 ratio to receive either crenolanib 100 mg or matching placebo orally (PO) 3 times daily (TID) in combination with best supportive care.
  • Diagnoses:
  • Status: Recruiting
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  • Promoting Breast Cancer Screening in Women Who Survived Childhood Cancer
  • The purpose of this study is to empower women to improve their health in two very important areas: breast and heart health. This twelve-month study will compare two methods of informing participants about potential health risks and ways to stay healthy. The EMPOWER Study has been designed for adult women who were treated for a childhood cancer with chest radiation.
  • Diagnoses:
  • Status: Recruiting
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  • Breast Cancer WEight Loss Study (BWEL Study)
  • This randomized phase III trial studies whether weight loss in overweight and obese women may prevent breast cancer from coming back (recurrence). Previous studies have found that women who are overweight or obese when their breast cancer is found (diagnosed) have a greater risk of their breast cancer recurring, as compared to women who were thinner when their cancer was diagnosed. This study aims to test whether overweight or obese women who take part in a weight loss program after being diagnosed with breast cancer have a lower rate of cancer recurrence as compared to women who do not take part in the weight loss program. This study will help to show whether weight loss programs should be a part of breast cancer treatment.
  • Diagnoses: Breast: Early Stage Disease
  • Status: Recruiting
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  • Maintenance Chemotherapy or Observation Following Induction Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy in Treating Younger Patients With Newly Diagnosed Ependymoma
  • This randomized phase III trial is studying maintenance chemotherapy to see how well it works compared to observation following induction chemotherapy and radiation therapy in treating young patients with newly diagnosed ependymoma. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as vincristine sulfate, carboplatin, cyclophosphamide, etoposide, and cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Giving more than one drug (combination chemotherapy) may kill more tumor cells. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells. Specialized radiation therapy that delivers a high dose of radiation directly to the tumor may kill more tumor cells and cause less damage to normal tissue. Giving chemotherapy with radiation therapy may kill more tumor cells and allow doctors to save the part of the body where the cancer started.
  • Diagnoses: Pediatric Oncology, Pediatric Brain Tumor
  • Status: Recruiting
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  • Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Blinatumomab in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed BCR-ABL-Negative B Lineage Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia
  • This randomized phase III trial studies combination chemotherapy with blinatumomab to see how well it works compared to induction chemotherapy alone in treating patients with newly diagnosed breakpoint cluster region (BCR)-c-abl oncogene 1, non-receptor tyrosine kinase (ABL)-negative B lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Monoclonal antibodies, such as blinatumomab, may block cancer growth in different ways by targeting certain cells. It is not yet known whether combination chemotherapy is more effective with or without blinatumomab in treating newly diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
  • Diagnoses: Leukemia/MDS
  • Status: Recruiting
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  • Standard-Dose Combination Chemotherapy or High-Dose Combination Chemotherapy and Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Germ Cell Tumors
  • This randomized phase III trial studies how well standard-dose combination chemotherapy works compared to high-dose combination chemotherapy and stem cell transplant in treating patients with germ cell tumors that have returned after a period of improvement or did not respond to treatment. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel, ifosfamide, cisplatin, carboplatin, and etoposide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving chemotherapy before a stem cell transplant stops the growth of cancer cells by stopping them from dividing or killing them. Giving colony-stimulating factors, such as filgrastim or pegfilgrastim, and certain chemotherapy drugs, helps stem cells move from the bone marrow to the blood so they can be collected and stored. Chemotherapy is then given to prepare the bone marrow for the stem cell transplant. The stem cells are then returned to the patient to replace the blood-forming cells that were destroyed by the chemotherapy. It is not yet known whether high-dose combination chemotherapy and stem cell transplant are more effective than standard-dose combination chemotherapy in treating patients with refractory or relapsed germ cell tumors.
  • Diagnoses: Pediatric Solid Tumors, Other Cancers
  • Status: Recruiting
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  • Radiation Therapy, Amifostine, and Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Newly Diagnosed Nasopharyngeal Cancer
  • This phase III trial is studying how well radiation therapy, amifostine, and chemotherapy work in treating young patients with newly diagnosed nasopharyngeal cancer. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells. Drugs, such as amifostine, may protect normal cells from the side effects of radiation therapy. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin and fluorouracil, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Giving radiation therapy together with amifostine and chemotherapy may kill more tumor cells.
  • Diagnoses:
  • Status: Recruiting
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  • Risk-Based Therapy in Treating Younger Patients With Newly Diagnosed Liver Cancer
  • This phase III trial studies the side effects and how well risk-based therapy works in treating younger patients with newly diagnosed liver cancer. Surgery, chemotherapy drugs (cancer fighting medicines), and when necessary, liver transplant, are the main current treatments for hepatoblastoma. The stage of the cancer is one factor used to decide the best treatment. Treating patients according to the risk group they are in may help get rid of the cancer, keep it from coming back, and decrease the side effects of chemotherapy.
  • Diagnoses:
  • Status: Recruiting
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  • Radiation Therapy Regimens in Treating Patients With Limited-Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer Receiving Cisplatin and Etoposide
  • Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as etoposide, carboplatin and cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. It is not yet known which radiation therapy regimen is more effective when given together with chemotherapy in treating patients with limited-stage small cell lung cancer. This randomized phase III trial is comparing different chest radiation therapy regimens to see how well they work in treating patients with limited-stage small cell lung cancer.
  • Diagnoses: Lung Cancer
  • Status: Recruiting
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  • Evaluation of the Duration of Therapy for Thrombosis in Children
  • The Kids-DOTT trial is a randomized controlled clinical trial whose primary objective is to evaluate non-inferiority of shortened-duration (6 weeks) versus conventional-duration (3 months) anticoagulation in children with first-episode acute venous thrombosis. The first stage of the trial has consisted of a pilot/feasibility component, which then continues as the definitively-powered trial.
  • Diagnoses: Pediatric Hematology/Blood Related
  • Status: Recruiting
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  • S1207 Hormone Therapy With or Without Everolimus in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer
  • RATIONALE: Estrogen can cause the growth of breast cancer cells. Hormone therapy using tamoxifen citrate, goserelin acetate, leuprolide acetate, anastrozole, letrozole, or exemestane, may fight breast cancer by lowering the amount of estrogen the body makes. Everolimus may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. It is not yet know whether hormone therapy is more effective when given with or without everolimus in treating breast cancer. PURPOSE: This randomized phase III trial studies how well giving hormone therapy together with or without everolimus work in treating patients with breast cancer.
  • Diagnoses:
  • Status: Recruiting
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  • PROSPECT: Chemotherapy Alone or Chemotherapy Plus Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Undergoing Surgery
  • The standard treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer involves chemotherapy and radiation, known as 5FUCMT, (the chemotherapy drugs 5-fluorouracil/capecitabine and radiation therapy) prior to surgery. Although radiation therapy to the pelvis has been a standard and important part of treatment for rectal cancer and has been shown to decrease the risk of the cancer coming back in the same area in the pelvis, some patients experience undesirable side effects from the radiation and there have been important advances in chemotherapy, surgery, and radiation which may be of benefit. The purpose of this study is to compare the effects, both good and bad, of the standard treatment of chemotherapy and radiation to chemotherapy using a combination regimen known as FOLFOX, (the drugs 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), oxaliplatin and leucovorin) and selective use of the standard treatment, depending on response to the FOLFOX. The drugs in the FOLFOX regimen are all FDA (Food and Drug Administration) approved and have been used routinely to treat patients with advanced colorectal cancer.
  • Diagnoses: Colorectal Cancer, Gastrointestinal Malignancies
  • Status: Recruiting
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  • Radiation Therapy With or Without Combination Chemotherapy or Pazopanib Hydrochloride Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Non-Rhabdomyosarcoma Soft Tissue Sarcomas That Can Be Removed by Surgery
  • This randomized phase II/III trial studies how well pazopanib hydrochloride, combination chemotherapy, and radiation therapy work and compares it to radiation therapy alone or in combination with pazopanib hydrochloride or combination chemotherapy in treating patients with newly diagnosed non-rhabdomyosarcoma soft tissue sarcomas that can be removed by surgery. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as ifosfamide and doxorubicin hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Pazopanib hydrochloride may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. It is not yet known whether radiation therapy works better when given with or without combination chemotherapy and/or pazopanib hydrochloride in treating patients with non-rhabdomyosarcoma soft tissue sarcomas.
  • Diagnoses: Pediatric Sarcoma
  • Status: Recruiting
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  • Nivolumab and Ipilimumab With or Without Sargramostim in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Melanoma That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery
  • This randomized phase II/III trial studies the side effects and best dose of nivolumab and ipilimumab when given together with or without sargramostim and to see how well they work in treating patients with stage III-IV melanoma that cannot be removed by surgery. Monoclonal antibodies, such as ipilimumab and nivolumab, may kill tumor cells by blocking blood flow to the tumor, by stimulating white blood cells to kill the tumor cells, or by attacking specific tumor cells and stop them from growing or kill them. Colony-stimulating factors, such as sargramostim, may increase the production of white blood cells. It is not yet known whether nivolumab and ipilimumab are more effective with or without sargramostim in treating patients with melanoma.
  • Diagnoses: Melanoma, Cutaneous Skin Cancer
  • Status: Recruiting
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Showing 1-30 of 622 items

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