Pediatric Leukemia Clinical Trials

Showing 1-10 of 10 items
  • Everolimus With Multiagent Re-Induction Chemotherapy in Pediatric Patients With ALL
  • Laboratory and other studies suggest that, the study drug, Everolimus (RAD001), may prevent tumor cell growth and also may increase the efficacy of other chemotherapy drugs. Everolimus is approved for use in the United States for certain types of cancer, such as kidney cancer. It has been extensively studied in people with various types of cancer as a single agent (a drug that is used alone to treat the cancer) or in combination with a number of other drugs. Studies in adults with cancer have also evaluated Everolimus in combination with other anti-tumor drugs. Information from lab studies and some other clinical trials suggests that Everolimus may kill leukemia cells on its own, and also make it more likely that steroids (such as prednisone) are able to kill leukemia cells. In this research study, we are looking to learn more about how Everolimus works in combination with other drugs which are commonly used to treat relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia (prednisone, vincristine, PEG-asparaginase, and doxorubicin). The main goal of the study is to evaluate the side effects of this treatment combination in order to determine a safe dose of Everolimus which can be given with these other 4 drugs.
  • Diagnoses: Pediatric Leukemia
  • Status: Recruiting
  • Different Therapies in Treating Infants With Newly Diagnosed Acute Leukemia
  • RATIONALE: Giving chemotherapy before a donor stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cancer cells. It also helps stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells. Giving cyclosporine, methotrexate, leucovorin, and antithymocyte globulin before and after transplant may stop this from happening. It is not yet known which treatment regimen is most effective in treating acute leukemia. PURPOSE: This randomized clinical trial is studying how well different therapies work in treating infants with newly diagnosed acute leukemia.
  • Diagnoses: Pediatric Leukemia
  • Status: Recruiting
Showing 1-10 of 10 items

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