Pediatric Leukemia Clinical Trials

Showing 1-13 of 13 items
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  • Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Rituximab in Treating Younger Patients With Stage III-IV Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma or B-Cell Acute Leukemia
  • This randomized phase II/III trial studies how well giving combination chemotherapy with or without rituximab works in treating younger patients with stage III or stage IV non-Hodgkin lymphoma or B-cell acute leukemia. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Monoclonal antibody, such as rituximab, can block cancer cells growth in different ways. Some block the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Others find cancer cells and help kill them or carry cancer-killing substances to them. It is not yet known whether giving combination chemotherapy together with rituximab is more effective in treating patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma or B-cell acute leukemia.
  • Diagnoses: Pediatric Oncology, Pediatric Leukemia
  • Status: Recruiting
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  • Busulfan, Cyclophosphamide, and Melphalan or Busulfan and Fludarabine Phosphate Before Donor Hematopoietic Cell Transplant in Treating Younger Patients With Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia
  • This randomized phase II trial studies how well giving busulfan, cyclophosphamide, and melphalan or busulfan and fludarabine phosphate before donor hematopoietic cell transplant works in treating younger patients with juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia. Giving chemotherapy before a donor hematopoietic transplant helps stop the growth of cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient, they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. It is not yet known whether giving busulfan, cyclophosphamide, and melphalan or busulfan and fludarabine phosphate before a donor stem cell transplant is more effective in treating juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia.
  • Diagnoses: Pediatric Leukemia
  • Status: Recruiting
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  • Phase I Trial of the Selective Inhibitor of Nuclear Export, KPT-330, in Relapsed Childhood ALL and AML
  • This research study involves participants who have acute lymphoblastic or acute myelogenous leukemia that has relapsed or has become resistant (or refractory) to standard therapies. This research study is evaluating a drug called KPT-330. Laboratory and other studies suggest that the study drug, KPT-330, may prevent leukemia cells from growing and may lead to the destruction of leukemia cells. It is thought that KPT-330 activates cellular processes that increase the death of leukemia cells. The main goal of this study is to evaluate the side effects of KPT-330 when it is administered to children and adolescents with relapsed or refractory leukemia.
  • Diagnoses: Pediatric Leukemia
  • Status: Recruiting
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  • Dose Escalation Study of EPZ-5676 in Pediatric Patients With Leukemias Bearing a Rearrangement of the MLL Gene
  • A subset of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) harbor rearrangements of the MLL gene, which are detected either by cytogenetic or fluorescent in situ hybridization evaluation at the time of diagnosis. A protein called DOT1L plays an important role in the malignant process in these leukemias. EPZ-5676 is a molecule that blocks the activity of DOT1L, and is therefore being evaluated in the treatment of patients with MLL-rearranged leukemias.
  • Diagnoses: Pediatric Leukemia
  • Status: Recruiting
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  • Different Therapies in Treating Infants With Newly Diagnosed Acute Leukemia
  • RATIONALE: Giving chemotherapy before a donor stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cancer cells. It also helps stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells. Giving cyclosporine, methotrexate, leucovorin, and antithymocyte globulin before and after transplant may stop this from happening. It is not yet known which treatment regimen is most effective in treating acute leukemia. PURPOSE: This randomized clinical trial is studying how well different therapies work in treating infants with newly diagnosed acute leukemia.
  • Diagnoses: Pediatric Leukemia
  • Status: Recruiting
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Showing 1-13 of 13 items

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