Pediatric Leukemia Clinical Trials

Showing 1-13 of 13 items
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  • Matched Targeted Therapy For High-Risk Leukemias
  • This research study is seeking to gain new knowledge about recurrent, refractory, or high risk leukemias and myelodysplastic syndrome in children and young adults. It is evaluating the use of specialized testing which analyzes the DNA and RNA of leukemia cells, called leukemia profiling. Once profiling is performed, the results are evaluated by an expert panel of physicians and scientists to determine if there is a targeted drug available that could attack the identified leukemia-associated alteration. This matched targeted therapy (MTT) recommendation is then communicated to the participant's primary oncologist.
  • Diagnoses: Pediatric Leukemia
  • Status: Recruiting
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  • Tretinoin and Arsenic Trioxide in Treating Patients With Untreated Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia
  • This phase III trial studies tretinoin and arsenic trioxide in treating patients with newly diagnosed acute promyelocytic leukemia. Standard treatment for acute promyelocytic leukemia involves high doses of a common class of chemotherapy drugs called anthracyclines, which are known to cause long-term side effects, especially to the heart. Tretinoin may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Arsenic trioxide may stop the growth of cancer cells by either killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Completely removing or reducing the amount of anthracycline chemotherapy and giving tretinoin together with arsenic trioxide may be an effective treatment for acute promyelocytic leukemia and may reduce some of the long-term side effects. Pediatric Acute Myelogenous Leukemia
  • Diagnoses: Pediatric Leukemia
  • Status: Recruiting
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  • A Trial of Epigenetic Priming in Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia
  • The overall aim of this study is to determine if epigenetic priming with a DNA methyltransferase inhibitor (DMTi) prior to chemotherapy blocks is tolerable and carries evidence of a clinical efficacy signal as determined by minimal residual disease (MRD), event-free survival (EFS), and overall survival (OS). Tolerability for each of the agents, as well as total reduction in DNA methylation and outcome assessments will be done to simultaneously obtain preliminary biological and clinical data for each DMTi in parallel. PRIMARY OBJECTIVES: - Evaluate the tolerability of five days of epigenetic priming with azacitidine and decitabine as a single agent DMTi prior to standard AML chemotherapy blocks. - Evaluate the change in genome-wide methylation burden induced by five days of epigenetic priming and the association of post-priming genome-wide methylation burden with event-free survival among pediatric AML patients. SECONDARY OBJECTIVES - Describe minimal residual disease levels following Induction I chemotherapy in patients that receive DMTi. - Estimate the event-free survival and overall survival of patients receiving a DMTi prior to chemotherapy courses.
  • Diagnoses: Pediatric Sarcoma, Pediatric Leukemia
  • Status: Recruiting
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  • Response-Based Chemotherapy in Treating Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome in Younger Patients With Down Syndrome
  • This phase III trial studies response-based chemotherapy in treating newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome in younger patients with Down syndrome. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Response-based chemotherapy separates patients into different risk groups and treats them according to how they respond to the first course of treatment (Induction I). Response-based treatment may be effective in treating acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome in younger patients with Down syndrome while reducing the side effects. Pediatric Acute Myelogenous Leukemia
  • Diagnoses: Pediatric Leukemia
  • Status: Recruiting
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  • Treatment of Newly Diagnosed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Children and Adolescents
  • Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common cancer diagnosed in children. The cancer comes from a cell in the blood called a lymphocyte. Normal lymphocytes are produced in the bone marrow (along with other blood cells) and help fight infections. In ALL, the cancerous lymphocytes are called lymphoblasts. They do not help fight infection and crowd out the normal blood cells in the bone marrow so that the body cannot make enough normal blood cells. ALL is always fatal if it is not treated. With current treatments, most children and adolescents with this disease will be cured. The standard treatment for ALL involves about 2 years of chemotherapy. The drugs that are used, and the doses of the drugs, are similar but not identical for all children and adolescents with ALL. Some children and adolescents receive stronger treatment, especially during the first several months. A number of factors are used to decide how strong the treatment should be to give the best chance for cure. These factors are called "risk factors". This trial is studying the use of a new, updated set of risk factors to decide how strong the treatment will be. The study also will test a new way of dosing a chemotherapy drug called pegaspargase (which is part of the standard treatment for ALL) based on checking levels of the drug in the blood and adjusting the dose based on the levels.
  • Diagnoses: Pediatric Leukemia
  • Status: Recruiting
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Showing 1-13 of 13 items

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