Clinical Trials results for "MDS"

Showing 1-5 of 5 items
1.
  • Radiation- and Alkylator-free Bone Marrow Transplantation Regimen for Patients With Dyskeratosis Congenita
  • Dyskeratosis congenita is a disease that affects numerous parts of the body, most typically causing failure of the blood system. Lung disease and a predisposition to cancer are also frequent causes of illness and death. Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) can cure the blood system but can make the lung disease and cancer predisposition worse, because of agents such as alkylators and radiation that are typically used in the procedure. Based on the biology of DC, we hypothesize that it may be possible to avoid these agents in patients with DC, and still have a successful BMT. In this protocol we will test whether a regimen that avoids alkylators and radiation can permit successful BMT without compromising survival in patients with DC.
  • Diagnoses: Pediatric Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant (HSCT)
  • Status: Recruiting
2.
  • Phase I Study of Olaprib and Temozolomide for Ewings Sarcoma
  • This research study is a Phase I clinical trial, which tests the safety of an investigational drug or combination of drugs and also tries to define the appropriate dose of the combination of investigational drugs to use for further studies. "Investigational" means that the combination of drugs is being studied. It also means that the FDA has not yet approved the combination of drugs for your type of cancer. Olaparib works by blocking the activity of a protein called poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) which is involved in DNA repair. Cancer cells rely on PARP to repair their DNA and enable them to continue dividing. Olaparib has been used in research studies with other cancers. Information from those other research studies suggests that this drug may help to treat patients with Ewing's sarcoma. The investigational drug olaparib is not approved for any use outside of research studies. Temozolomide (Temodar) is approved by the FDA for the treatment of a type of brain tumor, glioblastoma. It has been studied in Ewing sarcoma in previous research studies. While it is not approved by the FDA for Ewing sarcoma, it is considered part of standard treatment for relapsed disease. Laboratory studies suggest that the combination of olaparib and temozolomide may help kill Ewing sarcoma cells. In this research study, the investigators are looking for the highest dose of the combination of olaparib and temozolomide that can be given safely. The investigators will also begin to collect information about the effects of the combination on Ewing sarcoma.
  • Diagnoses: Sarcoma, Pediatric Sarcoma
  • Status: Recruiting
3.
4.
  • A Phase II Dose-escalation Study Characterizing the PK of Eltrombopag in Pediatric Patients With Previously Untreated or Relapsed Severe Aplastic Anemia or Recurrent Aplastic Anemia
  • This is a phase II, open label, multi-center, intra-patient dose escalation study to characterize the pharmacokinetics after oral administration of eltrombopag in combination with immunosuppressive therapy in pediatric patients with previously untreated or relapsed/refractory severe aplastic anemia or recurrent aplastic anemia. All patients will be treated with eltrombopag for the 26-week Treatment Period, followed by a 52-week Follow-Up Period. Patients who have been previously untreated with immunosuppressive therapy will be treated according to the standard of care, hATG/cyclosporine, in addition to eltrombopag. Patients with relapsed/refractory SAA or recurrent AA will be enrolled into one of two treatment options: hATG/cyclosporine plus eltrombopag or cyclosporine plus eltrombopag, depending on prior treatment with immunosuppressive therapy. After initiating treatment with eltrombopag, patients will have their dose assessed and modified as tolerated, until the targeted platelet count or maximum dose is achieved. Pharmacokinetic assessments will be performed at time points intended to capture steady state PK of the starting dose and highest dose achieved. Upon completion of the Treatment and Follow-Up Periods, all patients will be offered the opportunity to enroll in an additional 3 year Long Term Follow-Up Period.
  • Diagnoses: Pediatric Hematology/Blood Related
  • Status: Recruiting
5.
  • Response-Based Chemotherapy in Treating Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome in Younger Patients With Down Syndrome
  • This phase III trial studies response-based chemotherapy in treating newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome in younger patients with Down syndrome. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Response-based chemotherapy separates patients into different risk groups and treats them according to how they respond to the first course of treatment (Induction I). Response-based treatment may be effective in treating acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome in younger patients with Down syndrome while reducing the side effects. Pediatric Acute Myelogenous Leukemia
  • Diagnoses: Pediatric Leukemia
  • Status: Recruiting
Showing 1-5 of 5 items

Know Your Options

Not sure which clinical trials might be right for your child? Email our clinical trials team at clinicaltrials@danafarberbostonchildrens.org.
We can help you navigate your options.

Get Clinical Trial Updates

 

Stay informed about Dana-Farber/Boston Children's research efforts, including information on new and current clinical trials. Sign up to receive our email newsletter Advances in Pediatric Hematology/Oncology.

Download Our Clinical Trials

Download a list of our open clinical trials. Check back regularly for updates.