Clinical Trials results for "chemotherapy"

Showing 1-20 of 59 items
1.
  • Standard-Dose Combination Chemotherapy or High-Dose Combination Chemotherapy and Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Germ Cell Tumors
  • This randomized phase III trial studies how well standard-dose combination chemotherapy works compared to high-dose combination chemotherapy and stem cell transplant in treating patients with germ cell tumors that have returned after a period of improvement or did not respond to treatment. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel, ifosfamide, cisplatin, carboplatin, and etoposide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving chemotherapy before a stem cell transplant stops the growth of cancer cells by stopping them from dividing or killing them. Giving colony-stimulating factors, such as filgrastim or pegfilgrastim, and certain chemotherapy drugs, helps stem cells move from the bone marrow to the blood so they can be collected and stored. Chemotherapy is then given to prepare the bone marrow for the stem cell transplant. The stem cells are then returned to the patient to replace the blood-forming cells that were destroyed by the chemotherapy. It is not yet known whether high-dose combination chemotherapy and stem cell transplant are more effective than standard-dose combination chemotherapy in treating patients with refractory or relapsed germ cell tumors.
  • Diagnoses: Pediatric Solid Tumors, Other Cancers
  • Status: Recruiting
2.
  • Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Temsirolimus in Treating Patients With Intermediate Risk Rhabdomyosarcoma
  • This randomized phase III trial studies how well combination chemotherapy (vincristine sulfate, dactinomycin, cyclophosphamide alternated with vincristine sulfate and irinotecan hydrochloride) works compared to combination chemotherapy plus temsirolimus in treating patients with rhabdomyosarcoma (cancer that forms in the soft tissues, such as muscle), and has an intermediate chance of coming back after treatment (intermediate risk). Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Combination chemotherapy and temsirolimus may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. It is not yet known whether combination chemotherapy or combination chemotherapy plus temsirolimus is more effective in treating patients with intermediate-risk rhabdomyosarcoma.
  • Diagnoses: Pediatric Sarcoma, Pediatric Oncology
  • Status: Recruiting
3.
  • Maintenance Chemotherapy or Observation Following Induction Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy in Treating Younger Patients With Newly Diagnosed Ependymoma
  • This randomized phase III trial is studying maintenance chemotherapy to see how well it works compared to observation following induction chemotherapy and radiation therapy in treating young patients with newly diagnosed ependymoma. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as vincristine sulfate, carboplatin, cyclophosphamide, etoposide, and cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Giving more than one drug (combination chemotherapy) may kill more tumor cells. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells. Specialized radiation therapy that delivers a high dose of radiation directly to the tumor may kill more tumor cells and cause less damage to normal tissue. Giving chemotherapy with radiation therapy may kill more tumor cells and allow doctors to save the part of the body where the cancer started.
  • Diagnoses: Pediatric Oncology, Pediatric Brain Tumor
  • Status: Recruiting
4.
  • Radiation Therapy With or Without Combination Chemotherapy or Pazopanib Hydrochloride Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Non-Rhabdomyosarcoma Soft Tissue Sarcomas That Can Be Removed by Surgery
  • This randomized phase II/III trial studies how well pazopanib hydrochloride, combination chemotherapy, and radiation therapy work and compares it to radiation therapy alone or in combination with pazopanib hydrochloride or combination chemotherapy in treating patients with newly diagnosed non-rhabdomyosarcoma soft tissue sarcomas that can be removed by surgery. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as ifosfamide and doxorubicin hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Pazopanib hydrochloride may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. It is not yet known whether radiation therapy works better when given with or without combination chemotherapy and/or pazopanib hydrochloride in treating patients with non-rhabdomyosarcoma soft tissue sarcomas.
  • Diagnoses: Pediatric Sarcoma
  • Status: Recruiting
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  • Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Ganitumab in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Metastatic Ewing Sarcoma
  • This randomized phase II trial studies how well combination chemotherapy with or without ganitumab works in treating patients with newly diagnosed Ewing sarcoma that has spread to other parts of the body. Monoclonal antibodies, such as ganitumab, may block tumor growth in different ways by targeting certain cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as vincristine sulfate, doxorubicin hydrochloride, cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide, and etoposide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not yet known whether combination chemotherapy is more effective with or without ganitumab in treating patients with newly diagnosed Ewing sarcoma.
  • Diagnoses: Pediatric Sarcoma
  • Status: Recruiting
7.
  • Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Radiation Therapy in Treating Young Patients With Favorable-Risk Hodgkin Lymphoma
  • This phase II trial is studying how well combination chemotherapy with or without radiation therapy works in treating young patients with favorable-risk Hodgkin lymphoma. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as doxorubicin hydrochloride, vinblastine, mechlorethamine hydrochloride, vincristine sulfate, bleomycin, etoposide, and prednisone, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Giving more than one drug (combination chemotherapy) may kill more cancer cells. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill cancer cells for those patients that still had residual cancer at the end of chemotherapy. Giving combination chemotherapy with radiation therapy may kill more cancer cells and allow doctors to save the part of the body where the cancer started.
  • Diagnoses: Pediatric Hodgkin Lymphoma
  • Status: Recruiting
8.
  • Proton RT for the Treatment of Pediatric Rhabdomyosarcoma
  • The main purpose of this study is to see if using proton beam radiation therapy instead of photon beam radiation therapy can reduce side effects from radiation treatment for rhabdomyosarcoma. Photon beam radiation is the standard type of radiation for treating most rhabdomyosarcoma and many other types of cancer. Photon beam radiation enters the body and passes through healthy tissue, encounters the tumor, then leaves the body through healthy tissue. A beam of proton radiation enters the body and passes through healthy tissue, encounters tumor, but then stops. This means that less healthy tissue is affected by proton beam radiation than by photon beam radiation.
  • Diagnoses: Pediatric Sarcoma
  • Status: Recruiting
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  • Pilot and Feasibility Study of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Gene Transfer for the Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome
  • The Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome (WAS) is an inherited disorder that results in defects of the blood and bone marrow. It affects boys because the genetic mistake is carried on the X chromosome. Normal people have blood cells called platelets that stop bleeding when blood vessels are damaged. Boys with WAS have low numbers of platelets that do not function correctly. Boys with WAS are thus at risk for severe life-threatening bleeding. A normal immune system is made of special blood cells called white blood cells, which protect against infection and also fight certain types of cancer. In WAS, these white blood cells don't work as well as they should, making these boys very susceptible to infections and to a form of blood cancer known as lymphoma. The abnormal white blood cells of patients with WAS also cause diseases such as eczema and arthritis. Although WAS can be mild, severe forms need treatment as early as possible to prevent life-threatening complications due to bleeding, infection and blood cancer. Over the past decade, investigators have developed new treatments based on the investigators knowledge of the defective gene causing WAS. The investigators can now use genes as a type of medicine that will correct the problem in the patient's own bone marrow. The investigators call this process gene transfer. The procedure is very similar to a normal bone marrow transplant, in that the old marrow is killed off using chemotherapy, but is different because the patient's own bone marrow is given back after it is treated by gene transfer. This approach can be used even if the patient does not have any matched donors available and will avoid problems such as GVHD and rejection. The investigators wish to test whether this approach is safe and whether gene transfer will lead to the development of a healthy immune and blood system.
  • Diagnoses: Pediatric Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant (HSCT)
  • Status: Recruiting
12.
  • Study of Gene Therapy Using a Lentiviral Vector to Treat X-linked Chronic Granulomatous Disease
  • Chronic Granulomatous Disease (CGD) is an inherited immunodeficiency disorder which results from defects that prevent white blood cells from effectively killing bacteria, fungi and other microorganisms. Chronic granulomatous inflammation may compromise vital organs and account for additional morbidity. CGD is thought to affect approximately 1 in 200,000 persons, although the real incidence might be higher due to under-diagnosis of milder phenotypes. The first gene therapy approaches in X-CGD have shown that effective gene therapy requires bone-marrow (BM) conditioning with chemotherapy to make space for the gene-modified cells to engraft. These studies demonstrated that transplantation of gene modified stem cells led to production of white blood cells that could clear existing infections. However, some trails using mouse-derived retroviral vectors were complicated by the development of myelodysplasia and leukemia-like growth of blood cells. This trial will evaluate a new lentiviral vector that may be able to correct the defect, but have much lower risk for the complication. This study is a prospective non-controlled, non-randomized Phase I/II clinical trial to assess the safety, feasibility and efficacy of cellular gene therapy in patients with chronic granulomatous disease using transplantation of autologous bone marrow CD34+ cells transduced ex vivo by the G1XCGD lentiviral vector containing the human CGD gene. Primary objectives include evaluation of safety and evaluation of efficacy by biochemical and functional reconstitution in progeny of engrafted cells and stability at 12 months. Secondary objectives include evaluation of clinical efficacy, longitudinal evaluation of clinical effect in terms of augmented immunity against bacterial and fungal infection, transduction of CD34+ hematopoietic cells from X-CGD patients by ex vivo lentivirus-mediated gene transfer, and evaluation of engraftment kinetics and stability. Approximately 3-5 patients will be treated per site with a goal of 10 total patients to be treated with G1XCGD lentiviral vector.
  • Diagnoses: Pediatric Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant (HSCT)
  • Status: Recruiting
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  • Phase I Study of Olaprib and Temozolomide for Ewings Sarcoma
  • This research study is a Phase I clinical trial, which tests the safety of an investigational drug or combination of drugs and also tries to define the appropriate dose of the combination of investigational drugs to use for further studies. "Investigational" means that the combination of drugs is being studied. It also means that the FDA has not yet approved the combination of drugs for your type of cancer. Olaparib works by blocking the activity of a protein called poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) which is involved in DNA repair. Cancer cells rely on PARP to repair their DNA and enable them to continue dividing. Olaparib has been used in research studies with other cancers. Information from those other research studies suggests that this drug may help to treat patients with Ewing's sarcoma. The investigational drug olaparib is not approved for any use outside of research studies. Temozolomide (Temodar) is approved by the FDA for the treatment of a type of brain tumor, glioblastoma. It has been studied in Ewing sarcoma in previous research studies. While it is not approved by the FDA for Ewing sarcoma, it is considered part of standard treatment for relapsed disease. Laboratory studies suggest that the combination of olaparib and temozolomide may help kill Ewing sarcoma cells. In this research study, the investigators are looking for the highest dose of the combination of olaparib and temozolomide that can be given safely. The investigators will also begin to collect information about the effects of the combination on Ewing sarcoma.
  • Diagnoses: Sarcoma, Pediatric Sarcoma
  • Status: Recruiting
17.
  • Sorafenib and Cyclophosphamide/Topotecan in Patients With Relapsed and Refractory Neuroblastoma
  • This study will combine three drugs: sorafenib, cyclophosphamide and topotecan. Adding sorafenib to cyclophosphamide and topotecan may increase the effectiveness of this combination. The investigators first need to find out the highest dose of sorafenib that can be given safely together with cyclophosphamide and topotecan. This is the first study to test giving these three drugs together and will help determine the highest dose of sorafenib that can safely be given together with cyclophosphamide and topotecan to patients with resistant/relapsed neuroblastoma.
  • Diagnoses: Pediatric Neuroblastoma
  • Status: Recruiting
18.
  • A Phase 1 Study of the EZH2 Inhibitor Tazemetostat in Pediatric Subjects With Relapsed or Refractory INI1-Negative Tumors or Synovial Sarcoma
  • This is a Phase I, open-label, dose escalation and dose expansion study with a BID oral dose of tazemetostat. Subjects will be screened for eligibility within 14 days of the planned first dose of tazemetostat. A treatment cycle will be 28 days. Response assessment will be evaluated after 8 weeks of treatment and subsequently every 8 weeks while on study. The study has two parts: Dose Escalation and Dose Expansion. Dose escalation for subjects with the following relapsed/refractory malignancies: - Rhabdoid tumors: - Atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumor (ATRT) - Malignant rhabdoid tumor (MRT) - Rhabdoid tumor of kidney (RTK) - Selected tumors with rhabdoid features - INI1-negative tumors: - Epithelioid sarcoma - Epithelioid malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor - Extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma - Myoepithelial carcinoma - Renal medullary carcinoma - Other INI1-negative malignant tumors (e.g., dedifferentiated chordoma) (with Sponsor approval) - Synovial Sarcoma with a SS18-SSX rearrangement Dose Expansion at the MTD or the RP2D, for subjects with rhabdoid tumors (MRT/ATRT/RTK/selected tumors with rhabdoid features).
  • Diagnoses: Pediatric Sarcoma
  • Status: Recruiting
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Showing 1-20 of 59 items

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