Clinical Trials results for "gene therapy"

Showing 1-5 of 5 items
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  • Study of Gene Therapy Using a Lentiviral Vector to Treat X-linked Chronic Granulomatous Disease
  • Chronic Granulomatous Disease (CGD) is an inherited immunodeficiency disorder which results from defects that prevent white blood cells from effectively killing bacteria, fungi and other microorganisms. Chronic granulomatous inflammation may compromise vital organs and account for additional morbidity. CGD is thought to affect approximately 1 in 200,000 persons, although the real incidence might be higher due to under-diagnosis of milder phenotypes. The first gene therapy approaches in X-CGD have shown that effective gene therapy requires bone-marrow (BM) conditioning with chemotherapy to make space for the gene-modified cells to engraft. These studies demonstrated that transplantation of gene modified stem cells led to production of white blood cells that could clear existing infections. However, some trails using mouse-derived retroviral vectors were complicated by the development of myelodysplasia and leukemia-like growth of blood cells. This trial will evaluate a new lentiviral vector that may be able to correct the defect, but have much lower risk for the complication. This study is a prospective non-controlled, non-randomized Phase I/II clinical trial to assess the safety, feasibility and efficacy of cellular gene therapy in patients with chronic granulomatous disease using transplantation of autologous bone marrow CD34+ cells transduced ex vivo by the G1XCGD lentiviral vector containing the human CGD gene. Primary objectives include evaluation of safety and evaluation of efficacy by biochemical and functional reconstitution in progeny of engrafted cells and stability at 12 months. Secondary objectives include evaluation of clinical efficacy, longitudinal evaluation of clinical effect in terms of augmented immunity against bacterial and fungal infection, transduction of CD34+ hematopoietic cells from X-CGD patients by ex vivo lentivirus-mediated gene transfer, and evaluation of engraftment kinetics and stability. Approximately 3-5 patients will be treated per site with a goal of 10 total patients to be treated with G1XCGD lentiviral vector.
  • Diagnoses: Pediatric Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant (HSCT)
  • Status: Recruiting
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  • Gene Transfer for Sickle Cell Disease
  • A promising approach for the treatment of genetic diseases is called gene therapy. Gene therapy is a relatively new field of medicine that uses genetic material (mostly DNA) from the patient to treat his or her own disease. In gene therapy, the investigators introduce new genetic material in order to fix or replace the patient's disease gene, with the goal of curing the disease. The procedure is similar to a bone marrow transplant, in that the patient's malfunctioning blood stem cells are reduced or eliminated using chemotherapy, but it is different because instead of using a different person's (donor) blood stem cells for the transplant, the patient's own blood stem cells are given back after the new genetic material has been introduced into those cells. This approach has the advantage of eliminating any risk of GVHD, reducing the risk of graft rejection, and may also allow less chemotherapy to be utilized for the conditioning portion of the transplant procedure. The method used to introduce the gene into the patient's own blood stem cells is to engineer and use a modified version of a virus (called a 'vector') that efficiently inserts the "correcting" genetic material into the cells. The vector is a specialized biological medicine that has been formulated for use in human beings. The investigators have recently discovered a gene that is very important in the control of fetal hemoglobin expression. Increasing the expression of this gene in sickle cell patients could increase the amount of fetal hemoglobin while simultaneously reducing the amount of sickle hemoglobin in their blood, and therefore potentially cure the condition. In summary, the advantages of a gene therapy approach include: 1) it can be used even if the patient does not have a matched donor available; 2) it may allow a reduction in the amount of chemotherapy required to prepare the patient for the transplant; and 3) it will avoid the strong medicines often required to prevent and treat GVHD and rejection. The goal is to test whether this approach is safe, and whether using gene therapy to change the expression of this particular gene will lead to increased fetal hemoglobin production in people with sickle cell disease.
  • Diagnoses: Pediatric Hematology/Blood Related
  • Status: Recruiting
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  • A Study to Assess the Safety, Tolerability, and Efficacy of ST-400 for Treatment of Transfusion-Dependent Beta-thalassemia (TDT)
  • This is a single-arm, multi-site, single-dose, Phase 1/2 study to assess ST-400 in 6 subjects with transfusion-dependent β-thalassemia (TDT) who are ≥18 and ≤40 years of age. ST-400 is a type of investigational therapy that consists of gene edited cells. ST-400 is composed of the patient's own blood stem cells which are genetically modified in the laboratory using Sangamo's zinc finger nuclease (ZFN) technology to disrupt a precise and specific sequence of the enhancer of the BCL11A gene (which normally suppresses fetal hemoglobin production in erythrocytes). This process is intended to boost fetal hemoglobin (HbF), which can substitute for reduced or absent adult (defective) hemoglobin, and is done without the use of integrating viral vectors. ST-400 is then infused back into the patient after receiving conditioning chemotherapy to make room for the new cells in the bone marrow, with the aim of producing new erythrocytes with increased amounts of HbF. The primary objective is to understand safety and tolerability of ST-400, and secondary objectives are to assess the effects on HbF levels and transfusion requirements.
  • Diagnoses: Pediatric Hematology/Blood Related
  • Status: Recruiting
Showing 1-5 of 5 items

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