Clinical Trials results for "lymphoma"

Showing 1-14 of 14 items
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  • Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Radiation Therapy in Treating Young Patients With Favorable-Risk Hodgkin Lymphoma
  • This phase II trial is studying how well combination chemotherapy with or without radiation therapy works in treating young patients with favorable-risk Hodgkin lymphoma. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as doxorubicin hydrochloride, vinblastine, mechlorethamine hydrochloride, vincristine sulfate, bleomycin, etoposide, and prednisone, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Giving more than one drug (combination chemotherapy) may kill more cancer cells. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill cancer cells for those patients that still had residual cancer at the end of chemotherapy. Giving combination chemotherapy with radiation therapy may kill more cancer cells and allow doctors to save the part of the body where the cancer started.
  • Diagnoses: Pediatric Hodgkin Lymphoma
  • Status: Recruiting
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  • Adcetris (Brentuximab Vedotin), Combination Chemotherapy, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Younger Patients With Stage IIB, IIIB and IV Hodgkin Lymphoma
  • This pilot phase II trial studies how well giving brentuximab vedotin, combination chemotherapy, and radiation therapy works in treating younger patients with stage IIB, IIIB or IV Hodgkin lymphoma. Monoclonal antibodies, such as brentuximab vedotin, can block cancer growth in different ways. Some block the ability of cancer to grow and spread. Others find cancer cells and help kill them or carry cancer killing substances to them. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as etoposide, prednisone, doxorubicin hydrochloride, cyclophosphamide, and dacarbazine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill cancer cells. Giving brentuximab vedotin with combination chemotherapy may kill more cancer cells and reduce the need for radiation therapy.
  • Diagnoses: Pediatric Hodgkin Lymphoma
  • Status: Recruiting
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  • Abatacept as GVHD Prophylaxis Phase 2
  • This is a phase II multi-center, randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled trial. The investigators are doing this study to see if a new drug, abatacept, can be used together with a calcineurin inhibitor (cyclosporine or tacrolimus) and methotrexate to provide better protection against Acute Graft versus Host Disease (aGvHD) without causing more infections. Funding Source - FDA OOPD
  • Diagnoses: Pediatric Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant (HSCT)
  • Status: Recruiting
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  • Pilot and Feasibility Study of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Gene Transfer for the Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome
  • The Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome (WAS) is an inherited disorder that results in defects of the blood and bone marrow. It affects boys because the genetic mistake is carried on the X chromosome. Normal people have blood cells called platelets that stop bleeding when blood vessels are damaged. Boys with WAS have low numbers of platelets that do not function correctly. Boys with WAS are thus at risk for severe life-threatening bleeding. A normal immune system is made of special blood cells called white blood cells, which protect against infection and also fight certain types of cancer. In WAS, these white blood cells don't work as well as they should, making these boys very susceptible to infections and to a form of blood cancer known as lymphoma. The abnormal white blood cells of patients with WAS also cause diseases such as eczema and arthritis. Although WAS can be mild, severe forms need treatment as early as possible to prevent life-threatening complications due to bleeding, infection and blood cancer. Over the past decade, investigators have developed new treatments based on the investigators knowledge of the defective gene causing WAS. The investigators can now use genes as a type of medicine that will correct the problem in the patient's own bone marrow. The investigators call this process gene transfer. The procedure is very similar to a normal bone marrow transplant, in that the old marrow is killed off using chemotherapy, but is different because the patient's own bone marrow is given back after it is treated by gene transfer. This approach can be used even if the patient does not have any matched donors available and will avoid problems such as GVHD and rejection. The investigators wish to test whether this approach is safe and whether gene transfer will lead to the development of a healthy immune and blood system.
  • Diagnoses: Pediatric Hematology/Blood Related, Pediatric Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant (HSCT)
  • Status: Recruiting
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  • Study of Selinexor in Pediatric Solid Tumors
  • The investigators will conduct a phase 1 trial of Selinexor in children with recurrent or refractory solid tumors, including CNS tumors using the Rolling Six design. The aims of the trial will be to establish the maximum tolerated pediatric doses of tablet formulation; to investigate the toxicities, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of Selinexor in children with cancer; and to preliminarily explore efficacy in pediatric solid and CNS tumors, including medical and surgical expansion cohorts of HGG patients.
  • Diagnoses: Pediatric Solid Tumors
  • Status: Recruiting
9.
  • The iCat2, GAIN Consortium Study
  • This research study is evaluating the use of specialized testing of solid tumors including sequencing. The process of performing these specialized tests is called tumor profiling. The tumor profiling may result in identifying changes in genes of the tumor that indicate that a particular therapy may have activity. This is called an individualized cancer therapy (iCat) recommendation. The results of the tumor profiling and, if applicable, the iCat recommendation will be returned.
  • Diagnoses: Pediatric Solid Tumors
  • Status: Recruiting
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  • Carfilzomib in Combination With Cyclophosphamide and Etoposide for Children
  • This study evaluates the use of carfilzomib in combination with cyclophosphamide and etoposide for children with relapsed/refractory solid tumors or leukemia. The medications cyclophosphamide and etoposide are standard drugs often used together for the treatment of cancer in children with solid tumors or leukemia. Carfilzomib is FDA (Food and Drug Administration) approved in the United States for adults with multiple myeloma (a type of cancer). However, this drug is not approved for the disease being treated in this study. Since carfilzomib has not yet been used in this setting to treat this condition, the investigators must first find the best dose to give. The investigators are looking for the highest dose of carfilzomib that can be given safely. Therefore, not all children taking part in this study will receive the same dose of the study drug in the first part of the trial.
  • Diagnoses: Pediatric Oncology
  • Status: Recruiting
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Showing 1-14 of 14 items

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