Clinical Trials results for "stem cell transplant"

Showing 1-30 of 32 items
1.
  • Standard-Dose Combination Chemotherapy or High-Dose Combination Chemotherapy and Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Germ Cell Tumors
  • This randomized phase III trial studies how well standard-dose combination chemotherapy works compared to high-dose combination chemotherapy and stem cell transplant in treating patients with germ cell tumors that have returned after a period of improvement or did not respond to treatment. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel, ifosfamide, cisplatin, carboplatin, and etoposide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving chemotherapy before a stem cell transplant stops the growth of cancer cells by stopping them from dividing or killing them. Giving colony-stimulating factors, such as filgrastim or pegfilgrastim, and certain chemotherapy drugs, helps stem cells move from the bone marrow to the blood so they can be collected and stored. Chemotherapy is then given to prepare the bone marrow for the stem cell transplant. The stem cells are then returned to the patient to replace the blood-forming cells that were destroyed by the chemotherapy. It is not yet known whether high-dose combination chemotherapy and stem cell transplant are more effective than standard-dose combination chemotherapy in treating patients with refractory or relapsed germ cell tumors.
  • Diagnoses: Pediatric Solid Tumors
  • Status: Recruiting
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  • Gut Decontamination In Pediatric Allogeneic Hematopoietic
  • This research study is for participants who are undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and are at risk for developing acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). GVHD is a complication of HSCT in which immune cells from the donor cause inflammation and injury to tissues and organs of the HSCT recipient. Vancomycin-polymyxin B (commonly called "vancopoly") is an oral antibiotic that is given to people undergoing allogeneic HSCT as a preventive measure for acute GVHD. This research study is studying the effects of vancopoly on the microorganisms living in the intestine during and after stem cell transplantation.
  • Diagnoses: Pediatric Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant (HSCT)
  • Status: Recruiting
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  • Radiation- and Alkylator-free Bone Marrow Transplantation Regimen for Patients With Dyskeratosis Congenita
  • Dyskeratosis congenita is a disease that affects numerous parts of the body, most typically causing failure of the blood system. Lung disease and a predisposition to cancer are also frequent causes of illness and death. Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) can cure the blood system but can make the lung disease and cancer predisposition worse, because of agents such as alkylators and radiation that are typically used in the procedure. Based on the biology of DC, we hypothesize that it may be possible to avoid these agents in patients with DC, and still have a successful BMT. In this protocol we will test whether a regimen that avoids alkylators and radiation can permit successful BMT without compromising survival in patients with DC.
  • Diagnoses: Pediatric Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant (HSCT)
  • Status: Recruiting
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  • Pilot and Feasibility Study of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Gene Transfer for the Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome
  • The Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome (WAS) is an inherited disorder that results in defects of the blood and bone marrow. It affects boys because the genetic mistake is carried on the X chromosome. Normal people have blood cells called platelets that stop bleeding when blood vessels are damaged. Boys with WAS have low numbers of platelets that do not function correctly. Boys with WAS are thus at risk for severe life-threatening bleeding. A normal immune system is made of special blood cells called white blood cells, which protect against infection and also fight certain types of cancer. In WAS, these white blood cells don't work as well as they should, making these boys very susceptible to infections and to a form of blood cancer known as lymphoma. The abnormal white blood cells of patients with WAS also cause diseases such as eczema and arthritis. Although WAS can be mild, severe forms need treatment as early as possible to prevent life-threatening complications due to bleeding, infection and blood cancer. Over the past decade, investigators have developed new treatments based on the investigators knowledge of the defective gene causing WAS. The investigators can now use genes as a type of medicine that will correct the problem in the patient's own bone marrow. The investigators call this process gene transfer. The procedure is very similar to a normal bone marrow transplant, in that the old marrow is killed off using chemotherapy, but is different because the patient's own bone marrow is given back after it is treated by gene transfer. This approach can be used even if the patient does not have any matched donors available and will avoid problems such as GVHD and rejection. The investigators wish to test whether this approach is safe and whether gene transfer will lead to the development of a healthy immune and blood system.
  • Diagnoses: Pediatric Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant (HSCT)
  • Status: Recruiting
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  • Study of Gene Therapy Using a Lentiviral Vector to Treat X-linked Chronic Granulomatous Disease
  • Chronic Granulomatous Disease (CGD) is an inherited immunodeficiency disorder which results from defects that prevent white blood cells from effectively killing bacteria, fungi and other microorganisms. Chronic granulomatous inflammation may compromise vital organs and account for additional morbidity. CGD is thought to affect approximately 1 in 200,000 persons, although the real incidence might be higher due to under-diagnosis of milder phenotypes. The first gene therapy approaches in X-CGD have shown that effective gene therapy requires bone-marrow (BM) conditioning with chemotherapy to make space for the gene-modified cells to engraft. These studies demonstrated that transplantation of gene modified stem cells led to production of white blood cells that could clear existing infections. However, some trails using mouse-derived retroviral vectors were complicated by the development of myelodysplasia and leukemia-like growth of blood cells. This trial will evaluate a new lentiviral vector that may be able to correct the defect, but have much lower risk for the complication. This study is a prospective non-controlled, non-randomized Phase I/II clinical trial to assess the safety, feasibility and efficacy of cellular gene therapy in patients with chronic granulomatous disease using transplantation of autologous bone marrow CD34+ cells transduced ex vivo by the G1XCGD lentiviral vector containing the human CGD gene. Primary objectives include evaluation of safety and evaluation of efficacy by biochemical and functional reconstitution in progeny of engrafted cells and stability at 12 months. Secondary objectives include evaluation of clinical efficacy, longitudinal evaluation of clinical effect in terms of augmented immunity against bacterial and fungal infection, transduction of CD34+ hematopoietic cells from X-CGD patients by ex vivo lentivirus-mediated gene transfer, and evaluation of engraftment kinetics and stability. Approximately 3-5 patients will be treated per site with a goal of 10 total patients to be treated with G1XCGD lentiviral vector.
  • Diagnoses: Pediatric Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant (HSCT)
  • Status: Recruiting
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  • Sorafenib and Cyclophosphamide/Topotecan in Patients With Relapsed and Refractory Neuroblastoma
  • This study will combine three drugs: sorafenib, cyclophosphamide and topotecan. Adding sorafenib to cyclophosphamide and topotecan may increase the effectiveness of this combination. The investigators first need to find out the highest dose of sorafenib that can be given safely together with cyclophosphamide and topotecan. This is the first study to test giving these three drugs together and will help determine the highest dose of sorafenib that can safely be given together with cyclophosphamide and topotecan to patients with resistant/relapsed neuroblastoma.
  • Diagnoses: Pediatric Neuroblastoma
  • Status: Recruiting
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  • Carfilzomib in Combination With Cyclophosphamide and Etoposide for Children
  • This study evaluates the use of carfilzomib in combination with cyclophosphamide and etoposide for children with relapsed/refractory solid tumors or leukemia. The medications cyclophosphamide and etoposide are standard drugs often used together for the treatment of cancer in children with solid tumors or leukemia. Carfilzomib is FDA (Food and Drug Administration) approved in the United States for adults with multiple myeloma (a type of cancer). However, this drug is not approved for the disease being treated in this study. Since carfilzomib has not yet been used in this setting to treat this condition, the investigators must first find the best dose to give. The investigators are looking for the highest dose of carfilzomib that can be given safely. Therefore, not all children taking part in this study will receive the same dose of the study drug in the first part of the trial.
  • Diagnoses: Pediatric Oncology
  • Status: Recruiting
10.
  • A Phase II Dose-escalation Study Characterizing the PK of Eltrombopag in Pediatric Patients With Previously Untreated or Relapsed Severe Aplastic Anemia or Recurrent Aplastic Anemia
  • This is a phase II, open label, multi-center, intra-patient dose escalation study to characterize the pharmacokinetics after oral administration of eltrombopag in combination with immunosuppressive therapy in pediatric patients with previously untreated or relapsed/refractory severe aplastic anemia or recurrent aplastic anemia. All patients will be treated with eltrombopag for the 26-week Treatment Period, followed by a 52-week Follow-Up Period. Patients who have been previously untreated with immunosuppressive therapy will be treated according to the standard of care, hATG/cyclosporine, in addition to eltrombopag. Patients with relapsed/refractory SAA or recurrent AA will be enrolled into one of two treatment options: hATG/cyclosporine plus eltrombopag or cyclosporine plus eltrombopag, depending on prior treatment with immunosuppressive therapy. After initiating treatment with eltrombopag, patients will have their dose assessed and modified as tolerated, until the targeted platelet count or maximum dose is achieved. Pharmacokinetic assessments will be performed at time points intended to capture steady state PK of the starting dose and highest dose achieved. Upon completion of the Treatment and Follow-Up Periods, all patients will be offered the opportunity to enroll in an additional 3 year Long Term Follow-Up Period.
  • Diagnoses: Pediatric Hematology/Blood Related
  • Status: Recruiting
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  • Nanoparticle Albumin-Bound Rapamycin, Temozolomide, and Irinotecan Hydrochloride in Treating Pediatric Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Solid Tumors
  • This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of nanoparticle albumin-bound rapamycin when given together with temozolomide and irinotecan hydrochloride in treating pediatric patients with solid tumors that have come back after a period of time during which the tumor could not be detected or has not responded to treatment. Nanoparticle albumin-bound rapamycin may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as temozolomide and irinotecan hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving nanoparticle albumin-bound rapamycin, temozolomide, and irinotecan hydrochloride may work better in treating pediatric patients with solid tumors.
  • Diagnoses: Pediatric Solid Tumors
  • Status: Recruiting
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  • A Study to Determine Safety, Tolerability and Pharmacokinetics of Oral Dabrafenib In Children and Adolescent Subjects
  • This is a 2-part, study to determine the safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics of oral dabrafenib in children and adolescent subjects with advanced BRAF V600 mutation-positive solid tumors. Part 1 (dose escalation study) will identify the recommended Part 2 (tumor-specific expansion study) dose and regimen using a dose-escalation procedure. Approximately 6 to 18 subjects will participate in Part 1 and will receive a starting dose of 3 mg/kg and dose will deescalate or escalate between 1.5 milligram (mg)/kilogram (kg) and 6 mg/kg. Up to 6 subjects will be enrolled at one dose level dependent upon the number of subjects at the current dose level, the number of subjects who have experienced a dose limiting toxicity (DLT) at the current dose level, and the number of subjects enrolled but with data pending at the current dose level. Escalation may proceed until either a maximum tolerated dose (MTD) is established, or until the dose in which the median pharmacokinetic parameters consistent with exposure in adults are achieved. Cohorts may be added in order to evaluate additional dose levels. Part 2 consists of four disease-specific cohorts of subjects with tumors known to have BRAF V600 activation (pediatric low-grade gliomas, pediatric high-grade gliomas, Langerhans cell histiocytosis [LCH], and other tumors such as melanoma and papillary thyroid carcinoma [PTC]). Each cohort will enroll at least 10 subjects with a pre-dose and at least 1 post-dose disease assessment. In both the parts of the study, on Day 1, a single first dose will be administered, and repeat dosing will begin on Day 2. PK sampling will be performed on Day 1 and Day 15 for subjects >=25 kg in weight. For subjects <25 kg and >=10 kg in weight, blood samples for PK analysis will be collected on Day 1 and Day 15. For subjects <10kg in weight, blood samples for PK analysis will be collected after repeated administration on Day 15 only. Safety and tolerability will be assessed throughout the study. Treatment with dabrafenib will be continued until disease progression or until no clinical benefit or development of an unacceptable toxicity, or until they withdraw consent or begin a new therapy. At the end of treatment, a final study visit will occur.
  • Diagnoses: Pediatric Solid Tumors, Pediatric Brain Tumor
  • Status: Recruiting
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  • Study to Investigate Safety, Pharmacokinetic (PK), Pharmacodynamic (PD) and Clinical Activity of Trametinib in Subjects With Cancer or Plexiform Neurofibromas and Trametinib in Combination With Dabrafenib in Subjects With Cancers Harboring V600 Mutations
  • This is a 3-part (Part A, Part B, Part C), Phase I/IIa, multi-center, open label, study in pediatric subjects with refractory or recurrent tumors. Part A is a repeat dose, dose escalation monotherapy study that will identify the recommended phase II dose (RP2D) on the continuous dosing schedule using a 3 + 3 dose-escalation procedure. Part B will evaluate the preliminary activity of trametinib monotherapy in 4 disease-specific cohorts of subjects. Each cohort will enroll at least 10 response-evaluable subjects (evaluable for response is defined as a subject with a pre-dose and at least 1 post-dose disease assessment or clinical assessment of progression of disease). Part C is will be a 3+3 study design to determine the safety, tolerability and preliminary activity of the RP2D of trametinib in combination with a limited dose escalation of dabrafenib. Part C will enroll up to 18 subjects. . The overall goal of this trial is to efficiently establish safe, pharmacologically relevant dose of trametinib in infants, children and adolescents and determine preliminary activity of trametinib monotherapy in selected recurrent, refractory or unresectable childhood tumors.
  • Diagnoses: Pediatric Solid Tumors
  • Status: Recruiting
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  • A Pilot, Phase I/II Study of the Amino Acid Leucine in the Treatment of Patients With Transfusion-Dependent Diamond Blackfan Anemia
  • This study will determine the safety and possibility of giving the amino acid, leucine, in patients with Diamond Blackfan anemia(DBA)who are on dependent on red blood cell transfusions. The leucine is expected to produce a response in patients with DBA to the point where red blood cell production is increased. Red cell transfusions can then be less frequent or possibly discontinued. The investigators will study the side effects, if any, of giving leucine to DBA patients. Leucine levels of leucine will be obtained at baseline and during the study. The drug leucine will be provided in capsule form and taken 3 times a day for a total of 9 months.
  • Diagnoses: Pediatric Hematology/Blood Related
  • Status: Recruiting
20.
  • Study of Lorlatinib (PF-06463922)
  • Lorlatinib is a novel inhibitor across ALK variants, including those resistant to crizotinib. In this first pediatric phase 1 trial of lorlatinib, the drug will be utilized as a single agent and in combination with chemotherapy in patients with relapsed/refractory neuroblastoma. The dose escalation phase of this study (Cohort A1) uses a traditional Phase I 3+3 design. Once a recommended phase 2 pediatric dose is identified, an expansion cohort of 6 patients (Cohort B1), within which ALKi naïve patients will be prioritized, will be initiated. Parallel cohorts will be initiated in adults or patients with large BSA (Cohort A2) and in combination with chemotherapy upon establishing RP2D (Cohort B2).
  • Diagnoses: Pediatric Brain Tumor, Pediatric Neuroblastoma
  • Status: Recruiting
21.
  • A Study to Assess the Safety, Tolerability, and Efficacy of ST-400 for Treatment of Transfusion-Dependent Beta-thalassemia (TDT)
  • This is a single-arm, multi-site, single-dose, Phase 1/2 study to assess ST-400 in 6 subjects with transfusion-dependent β-thalassemia (TDT) who are ≥18 and ≤40 years of age. ST-400 is a type of investigational therapy that consists of gene edited cells. ST-400 is composed of the patient's own blood stem cells which are genetically modified in the laboratory using Sangamo's zinc finger nuclease (ZFN) technology to disrupt a precise and specific sequence of the enhancer of the BCL11A gene (which normally suppresses fetal hemoglobin production in erythrocytes). This process is intended to boost fetal hemoglobin (HbF), which can substitute for reduced or absent adult (defective) hemoglobin, and is done without the use of integrating viral vectors. ST-400 is then infused back into the patient after receiving conditioning chemotherapy to make room for the new cells in the bone marrow, with the aim of producing new erythrocytes with increased amounts of HbF. The primary objective is to understand safety and tolerability of ST-400, and secondary objectives are to assess the effects on HbF levels and transfusion requirements.
  • Diagnoses: Pediatric Hematology/Blood Related
  • Status: Recruiting
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  • Pevonedistat, Irinotecan Hydrochloride, and Temozolomide in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Solid Tumors or Lymphoma
  • This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of pevonedistat when giving together with irinotecan hydrochloride and temozolomide in treating patients with solid tumors or lymphoma that have come back after a period of improvement or that do not respond to treatment. Pevonedistat and irinotecan hydrochloride may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as temozolomide, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving pevonedistat, irinotecan hydrochloride, and temozolomide may work better in treating patients with solid tumors or lymphoma.
  • Diagnoses: Pediatric Solid Tumors
  • Status: Recruiting
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  • Study of Lenvatinib in Combination With Everolimus in Recurrent and Refractory Pediatric Solid Tumors, Including Central Nervous System Tumors
  • Phase 1 of this study, utilizing a rolling 6 design, will be conducted to determine a maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and recommended Phase 2 dose (RP2D), and to describe the toxicities of lenvatinib administered in combination with everolimus once daily to pediatric participants with recurrent/refractory solid tumors. Phase 2, utilizing Simon's optimal 2-stage design, will be conducted to estimate the antitumor activity of lenvatinib in combination with everolimus in pediatric participants with selected recurrent/refractory solid tumors including Ewing sarcoma/peripheral primitive neuroectodermal tumor (pPNET), rhabdomyosarcoma, and high grade glioma (HGG) using objective response rate (ORR) at Week 16 as the outcome measure.
  • Diagnoses: Pediatric Solid Tumors
  • Status: Recruiting
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Showing 1-30 of 32 items

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