• Fellowship Program Leadership

    Jennifer C. Kesselheim, MD, M.Ed, MBE

    Jennifer C. Kesselheim, MD, M.Ed, MBE

    Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Fellowship Program Director, Division of Hematology/Oncology; Associate Professor of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School

    Dr. Kesselheim attended college at the University of Wisconsin and completed her MD at the University of Pennsylvania, where she also earned a master’s in bioethics. Following medical school, she completed residency training in the Boston Combined Residency Program in pediatrics. As a resident, Dr. Kesselheim developed bioethics curricula, and she began to conduct national studies to assess the outcomes of ethics education in pediatric training. Her focus at the interface of ethics, professionalism, and medical education led her to pursue a master’s degree in education from Harvard University, which she completed while a fellow in pediatric hematology/oncology at Boston Children’s Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. As an educator, Dr. Kesselheim directs the Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Fellowship Program at Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s, where she also cares for patients with hematologic malignancies. She directs the Master of Medical Science (MMSc) in Medical Education based at Harvard Medical School, a two-year graduate program blending coursework in medical education with mentored research. Dr. Kesselheim’s research investigates the methods and outcomes of physician education in the areas of humanism, ethics, and professionalism. Her projects pertain to the measurement of humanism among pediatric hematology/oncology trainees, integrating interprofessional education into medical school, fostering ownership and accountability in patient care, balancing service and education during training, the hidden curriculum of speaking up, and assessing knowledge of ethical principles among pediatricians and pediatric ethicists. Dr. Kesselheim lives in Boston with her husband, Aaron; son, Max (age 11); daughter, Sydney (age 7); and son, Leo (age 4).

    Angela M. Feraco, MD, MMSc

    Angela M. Feraco, MD, MMSc

    Associate Program Director, Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Fellowship Program; Instructor, Harvard Medical School

    Dr. Feraco is a pediatric oncologist whose scholarship focuses on communication and interprofessional collaboration in the care of children with cancer. Dr. Feraco received her MD from the University of California, San Francisco. She served as a pediatric resident and chief resident in the Boston Combined Residency Program and completed her fellowship training in pediatric hematology/oncology at Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s. Dr. Feraco completed a master’s degree in medical education at Harvard Medical School and is active in graduate medical education leadership locally and nationally. She directs the core educational curriculum for first-year fellows and runs the pediatric oncology resident rotation. In her role as Associate Program Director, Dr. Feraco focuses on the interface between the training program and clinical operations.

    Katie A. Greenzang, MD, EdM

    Katie A. Greenzang, MD, EdM

    Associate Program Director, Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Fellowship Program; Instructor, Harvard Medical School

    Dr. Greenzang is a pediatric oncologist and investigator whose research focuses on optimizing patient-provider communication and shared treatment decision-making, with a specific focus on late effects of cancer and pediatric cancer survivorship. Dr. Greenzang graduated from Harvard University and attended medical school at Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons. She completed her pediatrics residency and chief residency at the University of Washington’s Seattle Children’s Hospital, and her fellowship training in pediatric hematology/oncology at Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s. Medical education is also a focus of Dr. Greenzang’s career; she received a master's in education from the Harvard Graduate School of Education as a Zuckerman Fellow, and she is a former Harvard Medical School Academy Medical Education Fellow. Dr. Greenzang teaches and leads several courses at Harvard Medical School and at Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s, and she conducts research on the development of communication skills and professionalism. As an Associate Program Director, Dr. Greenzang gives dedicated attention to fellow well-being and the overall learning environment.

    Alejandro Gutierrez, MD

    Alejandro Gutierrez, MD

    Associate Program Director, Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Fellowship Program; Assistant Professor in Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School

    Dr. Gutierrez is a pediatric oncology physician-scientist whose research is focused on deciphering the molecular basis of chemotherapy resistance in T-lymphoblastic leukemias and genetically defined solid tumors. His work has identified new mechanisms of resistance to conventional chemotherapeutics and revealed novel strategies for therapeutic intervention, some of which have translated into active clinical trials. He received his MD from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and completed a pediatrics residency at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, followed by a fellowship in pediatric hematology/oncology at Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s. His postdoctoral research training was with Dr. A. Thomas Look at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. As an Associate Program Director, Dr. Gutierrez is focused on advising fellows as they define their research direction and mentorship plans and fostering their development into successful independent investigators.

    Scott A. Armstrong, MD, PhD

    Scott A. Armstrong, MD, PhD

    Pediatric Oncology Chair at Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s, Associate Chief of the Division of Hematology/Oncology at Boston Children’s Hospital

    Dr. Armstrong is a pediatric oncologist and leader in leukemia research whose studies have led to several findings that point to promising new therapies. The major focus of his career has been on delineating the biology of childhood cancers and the development of new therapeutic approaches for children with cancer. He has developed a large and robust research program that has focused on the mechanisms of leukemia development and the relationship between leukemia and normal hematopoietic stem cells. He has also developed an interest in the mechanisms by which chromatin modifications control leukemogenic gene expression and has used this understanding to develop small molecule approaches that he continues to pursue. This work has led to the development of a number of clinical trials that are being assessed in adults and children with cancer. Dr. Armstrong received his MD and PhD from the University of Texas Southwestern Medical School in Dallas, Texas. He performed his residency and fellowship in pediatric hematology/oncology at Boston Children’s Hospital, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, and Harvard Medical School. Dr. Armstrong’s work has been recognized with the Till and McCulloch Award from the International Society of Experimental Hematology, the Claire W. and Richard P. Morse Research Award from Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, the Wilson S. Stone Award from MD Anderson Cancer Center, the Paul Marks Prize for Cancer Research from Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, the E. Mead Johnson Award from the Society for Pediatric Research, and the Dameshek Prize from the American Society of Hematology.

    David A. Williams, MD

    David A. Williams, MD

    Chief Scientific Officer and Senior Vice President; Chief, Division of Hematology/Oncology, Boston Children’s Hospital (on sabbatical 2019-20); Leland Fikes Professor of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School

    Dr. Williams is the Senior Vice President and Chief Scientific Officer at Boston Children’s Hospital and Chief of Hematology/Oncology at Boston Children’s Hospital. He was a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator for 16 years and his laboratory has been continuously funded by the NIH since 1986. He has trained over 45 fellows and post-doctoral fellows and numerous residents and medical students in his laboratory, the majority of which are still in academic medicine. He is a member of the National Academy of Medicine and has published over 250 peer-reviewed manuscripts and textbook chapters. He formerly served on the NIH Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee and Gene Therapy Safety Assessment Board. He is actively involved in gene therapy trials for immunodeficiency and neurological genetic diseases and has been the investigator, co-investigator or sponsor (IND holder) of multiple previous gene therapy trials and is sponsor or investigator of four current trials. He served as the Editor-In-Chief of Molecular Therapy from 2004-2009 and is co-founder of the Transatlantic Gene Therapy Consortium and the North American Pediatric Aplastic Anemia Consortium (NAPAAC). His basic research has focused on hematopoietic stem cell biology, including genetic diseases of the blood and specifically molecular and biochemical analysis of the interaction between hematopoietic stem cells and the bone marrow supporting environment. His laboratory has significant experience in stem cell biology, hematopoiesis, and gene correction and transfer techniques. His research has described the molecular basis for two rare immunodeficiency diseases due to mutations of RAC2 and RHOH, members of the RHO GTPase family of signaling molecules. He has multiple patents of which two have been developed into FDA-approved drugs (Neumega™ and Retronectin™) and is co-founder of two biotech companies, Orchard Therapeutics and Alerion Biosciences. Dr. Williams is a past President of the International Society of Experimental Hematology and the American Society of Hematology.

    Vijay G. Sankaran, MD, PhD

    Vijay G. Sankaran, MD, PhD

    Interim Chief, Division of Hematology/Oncology, Boston Children’s Hospital; Institute Physician; Associate Professor of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School

    Dr. Sankaran is a physician-scientist focused on caring for patients with non-malignant hematologic disorders with a special interest in diseases of blood cell production and the hemoglobin disorders, including sickle cell disease and thalassemia. He earned his MD and PhD from Harvard Medical School. After internship and residency training with the Boston Combined Residency Program, he completed a hematology/oncology fellowship at Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s. The major focus of his career has been on delineating how human genetic variation impacts hematopoiesis in health and disease, as well as how these insights can inform the development of new therapeutic approaches for children with blood disorders.

    Alan B. Cantor, MD, PhD

    Alan B. Cantor, MD, PhD

    Deputy Chief, Division of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology; Associate Professor of Pediatrics

    Dr. Cantor received his BA degree with a major in biochemistry from Cornell University. He attended the Medical Scientist Training Program at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, where he received his MD/PhD degree. He performed residency training in general pediatrics at St. Louis Children’s Hospital and then entered the Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Fellowship Program at Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s, performing postdoctoral research with Dr. Stuart Orkin. Dr. Cantor began his independent laboratory at Boston Children’s Hospital in 2004. His group focuses on further understanding the gene regulatory mechanisms involved in normal hematopoiesis and how their dysregulation leads to leukemia and other human hematopoietic disorders. He currently attends on the hematology service and serves as Deputy Chief of the Division of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology. He joined the fellowship leadership in 2017 and provides support for the non-malignant hematology components of the training program.

  • Our Fellowship Programs

    Learn about our single-year clinical training programs as well as our new Early Oncology Drug Development Fellowship Program.
  • Ranked #1 for Cancer Care

    U.S. News Best Children's Hospitals logoU.S. News & World Report ranked Dana-Farber/Boston Children's the #1 pediatric cancer hospital in the nation.

  • A Long Legacy of Research and Treatment

    Dana-Farber/Boston Children's History

    More than 70 years ago, Dr. Sidney Farber refused to accept that childhood cancer was untreatable. His determination led to the development of chemotherapy and the first remissions of childhood leukemia.