In zebrafish, a way to find new cancer therapies, targeting tumor promoters

September 20, 2018

zebrafish-cancer-drug-research

The lab of Leonard Zon, MD, has long been interested in making blood stem cells in quantity for therapeutic purposes. To test for their presence in zebrafish, their go-to research model, they turned to the MYB gene, a marker of blood stem cells. To spot the cells, Joseph Mandelbaum, a PhD candidate in the lab, attached a fluorescent green tag to MYB that made it easily visible in transparent zebrafish embryos.

“It was a real workhorse line for us,” says Zon, who directs the Stem Cell Research Program at Boston Children’s Hospital.

In addition to being a marker of blood stem cells, MYB is an oncogene. About five years ago, Zon was having lunch at a cancer meeting and, serendipitously, sat next to Jeff Kaufman, who was also interested in MYB. Kaufman was excited to hear about Zon’s fluorescing MYB zebrafish, which can be studied at scale and are surprisingly similar to humans genetically.

“Have you ever heard of adenoid cystic carcinoma?” he asked Zon.

Read the full story on Vector.

Media Inquiries

Peter Cohenno
774-218-5530
peter_cohenno@dfci.harvard.edu

Follow Us!

Stay updated on our latest news and developments by following us on Twitter.

Twitter Logo