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Nine-year-old with Brain Tumor gets to Finish Concert with Friends

December 11, 2014
Sophie Fellows, a wispy 9-year-old Vermont girl with a love of the violin, was diagnosed with a brain tumor a day after she was stricken with a painful headache in the middle of a holiday concert in Vermont. A day before her surgery, her music teacher and fellow musicians joined Sophie at Boston Children’s Hospital to finish the concert, The Boston Globe reports.

Common Genetic Variations May Contribute to Treatment-related Cognitive Problems in Children with Leukemia

December 09, 2014
Common variations in four genes related to brain inflammation or cells' response to damage from oxidation may contribute to the problems with memory, learning and other cognitive functions seen in children treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

Stem Cell Transplant without Radiation or Chemotherapy Pre-treatment Shows Promise for Rare Bone Marrow Failure

December 08, 2014
Researchers report promising outcomes from a clinical trial with patients with a rare form of bone marrow failure who received a hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) after pre-treatment with immunosuppressive drugs only. This is the first trial reporting successful transplant in dyskeratosis congenita (DC) patients without the use of any radiation or conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy beforehand.

The Bad Disease: Inside Egypt’s Children’s Cancer Hospital

December 07, 2014
Behind the ancient mosques, apartments, and historic coffee shops in the Cairo neighborhood Sayyida Zeinab is something new and unexpected: a children’s cancer hospital built on the old bones of a defunct slaughterhouse, Foreign Affairs reports in a story on the partnership between Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s and Children’s Cancer Hospital Egypt.

Researchers Take New Approach to Stop ‘Most Wanted’ Cancer Protein

November 07, 2014
Scientists studying neuroblastoma have found a way to defeat one of the most tantalizing yet elusive target proteins in cancer cells – employing a strategy that turns the protein’s own molecular machinations against it in research that could have implications in other malignancies.

Unlocking the Secrets of Pediatric Cancers can Help Doctors Treat Children and Adults

November 07, 2014
Not only are the combined life-long contributions of children cured of cancer enormous, but understanding cancers of young children could also hold the key to understanding a broad range of adult cancers, David Williams, MD, writes in Huffington Post. The time is ripe to allocate more resources, public and private, to research on pediatric cancer.

David G. Nathan, MD, Wins Boston Children’s Hospital Inaugural Lifetime Impact Award

November 03, 2014
David G. Nathan, MD, president emeritus of Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and physician-in-chief emeritus of Boston Children’s Hospital, was honored as the inaugural recipient of the Boston Children’s Hospital Lifetime Impact Award at the hospital’s second annual Global Pediatric Innovation Summit. Nathan was a pioneer in pediatric hematology/oncology and was – and continues to be – a mentor to generations of leading clinicians and physician-scientist researchers.

Liberia’s Response to Ebola

October 14, 2014
New England Cable News interviewed Venee Tubman, MD, about the Ebola outbreak in Liberia, where she has done extensive work on sickle cell disease.

Gene Therapy for “Bubble Boy” Disease Appears to be Effective and Safe

October 09, 2014
A new form of gene therapy for boys with “bubble boy” disease appears to be not only effective but also may avoid the late-developing leukemia seen in a quarter of SCID-X1 patients in pioneering gene therapy trials in Europe more than a decade ago.

Parents of Late Quincy Teen Watch “Fault in Our Stars” with Her Providers

September 24, 2014
The parents of the teenaged girl whose story inspired “The Fault in Our Stars” spoke at a special showing of the movie at the hospital that treated her, the Patriot Ledger reports.
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